"I've never seen anything like it": enigmatic object on "Bares for Rares"

adminDecember 27, 2018




Updated December 27, 2018, 16:46

Congratulations on the Thursday series "Bares for Rares": In the offer there was a flea market. Horst Lichter was astonished: "What about a device, Jesus Mary?" and admitted, "I've never seen anything like it." Fortunately, for such serious cases, experts …




It was fascination at first glance: Herbert Koschek from Lüdenscheid had discovered the souvenir on holiday at a flea market in Austria. "Neither I nor I did not know what it was," said the 65-year-old electrician. "I just liked it." Koschek thought, "At ten euros you can't do much wrong."

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"I've never seen anything like that," Horst Lichter said helplessly, but at least written on a measuring instrument. Doctors from Herbert Koschek's sports group had suggested that it was "a legal angle, which one used to measure body parts." Wrong, expert Sven Deutschmanek knew.

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"I also had to take a closer look," said the expert. "We are at war," says Sven Deutschmanek. In World War I, to be exact. "W and N have been the emblems of the imperial army," Deutschmanek explained. "Then comes the imperial crown and the year of decline, in 1916."

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Another feature revealed the last secret to the souvenir: "M.99". "M.99 is not a screw size," said Sven Deutschmanek. It was rather a so-called battery ammunition car in World War I.

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"This meter is actually a forceps to delay the head of war," said Deutschmanek. "Of course it was important that you not just shoot." With iron and brass tools the height and detonation time could be adjusted.

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The conclusion of Sven Deutschmanek: "This is something very extraordinary." The seller agreed, "I've never seen it either." On it shines: "I would like to join this."

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"Minimum 100 Euro" Herbert Koschek wanted for her martial arts. "Militaria collectors are a lot, we go higher," said Deutschmanek combative. He believed that between 250 and 500 euros was realistic. "I am pleasantly surprised," admitted Herbert Koschek.

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In the dealer room the guess went on. "What is it?" Asked Susanne Steiger (others from the left). "I've never seen anything like that," said Walter Lehnertz (left).

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The bid started before it was money. When Herbert Koschek revealed that "16" was for the year, Fabian Kahl slipped: "1716". No! "1816?" No! Koschek increased to 1916. "Yes, where do you start?" Asked Julian Schmitz-Avila. Much more important: "Where do you stop?" Says Susanne Steiger.

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"8 Euro" suggested Walter Lehnertz in a joke. "It's 30 more than I would have started," joked Julian Schmitz-Avila. Ernst made Fabian Kahl with 120 euros. Susanne Steiger came out. When Kahl increased to 150, the male messengers also gave up.

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"Then we have to do it up among us," said Fabian Kahl. He waved the sales item around: "I'm armed, not you." Koschek offset the expertise of 250 to 500 euros. Kahls last bid of 200 euros he accepted – charged with the flea market price a profit of 190 euros. He wants to invest the money deserved on vacation in the next vacation.

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Viewers held the dealers in this microscope by the company Ernst Leitz. Esther Ollick paid 150 euros for the precision work of the 1940s on Thursday's episode of "Bares for Rares".

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A gold cutter figure from the late 30s turned out to be more valuable than expected: Walter Lehnertz paid 260 euros for the "Kitty" model.

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