Heartbreaking reason why the queen does not remove the Christmas decorations until February.

adminNovember 25, 2018




For most of us, leaving the Christmas decorations until January 6 would be considered bad luck.

But the queen leaves hers at the Sandringham estate of the family until the beginning of February, and there is a moving reason.

In memory of the late father of the queen, King George VI, she stays at Sandringham to commemorate the anniversary of her death on February 6 and the Christmas decorations remain until she and Prince Philip leave.

His father died at the age of 56 while he was sleeping on the farm in 1952, when the queen was only 25 years old.

I was on a trip to Kenya at that time, having to interrupt the tour and fly back to the UK.

The queen stays at Sandringham until her father's birthday

The queen wrote a heartfelt letter to her father's private secretary that revealed her deep grief over her early death.

A young Queen Elizabeth wrote to Sir Eric Mievill a month after becoming queen, saying: "Everything seems so incredible that my father is no longer here and it is only after a time has passed that one begins to realize how much that we miss him. "

Written by hand on March 3, 1952, the letter was one of the first that Elizabeth finished with her new signature as Queen: "Elizabeth R."

The queen making a speech at Sandringham on Christmas day

She wrote that she was "grateful" because her father died so peacefully and how her husband Philip and their children Charles, three and Anne, 18 months, were helping with their pain.

The moving message says: "My mother and my sister have been wonderful, because they have lost a lot, I have my own family to help me."

Jorge VI had to take charge of what was launched suddenly after the abdication of his brother, Eduardo VIII, in 1936.

Despite the unexpected role, he worked hard to adapt and fought, particularly during the difficult years of World War II.

The decision of the family to stay in Britain during the war made them favorable to the public.



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