Donald Trump, Russia's hacking did not make the United States racist, we already were

adminOctober 30, 2018




Comedians Dave Chappelle and Jon Stewart warned Americans not to give President Donald Trump "too much credit" in defining the country, saying that racial and class divisions existed long before him or Russia's interference in elections. 2016

Chappelle, who earlier this month said she believes Trump's rhetoric has become "disgusting," told Christiane Amanpour of CNN International that it has been "very difficult to observe the past few years" of this administration that leads the country. The comedian defended his monologue "Saturday Night Live" of 2016 about giving Trump "an opportunity" just a few days after the election, and noted with Stewart that his optimism about the fact that Trump is a good leader has vanished .

Chappelle also disagreed with people who argue that the powerful problems in the United States, including racial and class inequality, began with Trump's victory in the 2016 presidential election.

"Even when they say that Russia influenced the elections," Chappelle told Amanpour in an interview to be aired on Tuesday afternoon, "it's as if Russia makes us racists, who's doing it?" Oh, good, my God. , Thank you". My God, I thought it was us. "

Dave Chappelle Comedians Dave Chappelle and Jon Stewart warned Americans not to give President Donald Trump "too much credit" in defining the country, and said that racial and class divisions existed long before any intervention in Russia in 2016. Getty Images Kevin WinterStaff

When Amanpour asked him if the "Trump era" had been great for comedic content, Chappelle replied: "He would not even name the era after him. He's getting too much credit."

"Yes [Russia] He killed the country in that way, then we are the murder weapon, "joked Chappelle.[Trump]"He's not doing the wave, he's surfing it."

Chappelle defended his monologue of SNL 2016 about giving Trump the opportunity to prove himself in office, calling it "the right thing at the right time." He noted that black Americans have seen many elections pass with mixed feelings and "to some extent, people reacted in an exaggerated way." But Chappelle said many people saw "storming the street" as the only real alternative to giving Trump a chance in the weeks after his election, according to CNN.

"Are you doing a good job? Am I happy with what you are doing?" Chappelle asked rhetorically. "No, it's been very hard to see the last couple of years."

Sitting next to Chappelle, the former host of "The Daily Show," Jon Stewart, agreed that "there was a part of me" that hoped that Trump's rise to the White House would move him beyond the controversial candidate who He was on the way to his choice.

"Interestingly, he transformed the White House, and the White House could not transform it."

Chappelle and Stewart's interview with Amanpour will be broadcast on CNN International at 2 p.m. ET and in PBS at 11 p.m. ET Tuesday.



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